Solutions

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

Three Things to Know About Tropical Storm Elsa

July 7, 2021 | 11:57 AM CT

What’s happening?

  • Elsa made landfall as a Tropical Storm along the western Florida coast roughly 50 miles southeast of Tallahassee with sustained winds of up to 65 mph, 10 mph below Category 1 hurricane intensity.
  • The remnants of Elsa will track along the eastern US coast up to Maine, bringing strong winds and heavy rain which will result in localized flooding.
  • Elsa will interact with the jet stream and is expected to re-intensify on Friday, bringing tropical storm-force winds to much of the Northeastern coast.

What’s the greatest concern?

  • Elsa is not expected to stall or bring widespread catastrophic flooding, so the primary impact will be localized flooding.
Map of Tropical Storm Elsa
Precipitation Forecasted Along East Coast in Next 24 Hours

What does this mean for the affected area?

  • Elsa is not expected to be a catastrophic event, as building standards in hurricane-prone Florida should prevent large-scale wind damage, and Elsa is moving fast enough to prevent widespread flooding.

To learn more about this year’s Atlantic hurricane season, check out the 2021 Hurricane Report.

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Get The Latest Updates

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

By submitting this form I agree that CoreLogic may contact me at the email address I provided for information about products, services or insights. I understand that consent can be withdrawn at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link contained in email messages.

Most Recent

Want to download the 2021 Hurricane Report?

You can read the entire report for free. All you need to do is fill out a form.

Get Report

Related Posts

Header Intelligence Podcast
Insurance

What’s in a Loss Estimate?

At CoreLogic, one of the areas we keep close tabs on is how weather and climate affect property as this could have some surprising downstream effects. The CoreLogic Hazard HQ team keeps a close eye on the state of weather covering catastrophes in the US and around the world.